On Friday, June 11, 2021, Phil Webber of the Rotary Club of Vancouver delivered 84 of the Dictionary & Gazetteer Canadian Edition books to Tim Krug, Principal of John Norquay Elementary School ("Norquay") so that each grade 3 student at Norquay would receive his or her own Dictionary.   

In addition,  Phil delivered three boxes of books to Britannia Community Elementary School, containing 37 titles and 131 books in total, which are all focused on fostering literacy or knowledge of the English language plus 36 of the Dictionary & Gazetteer Canadian Edition books to Britannia so that every one of the 30 grade 3 students will receive his or her own dictionary.

On Friday, June 11, 2021, Phil Webber of the Rotary Club of Vancouver delivered 84 of the Dictionary & Gazetteer Canadian Edition books, purchased from The Dictionary Project, to Tim Krug, Principal of John Norquay Elementary School ("Norquay").   The Rotary Club of Vancouver had funded the purchase of the Dictionaries so that each grade 3 student at Norquay would receive his or her own Dictionary. 


Here, Tim Krug is receiving the Dictionaries for the
grade 3 students at John Norquay Elementary School.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Phil Webber also delivered 36 of the Dictionary & Gazetteer Canadian Edition books, purchased from The Dictionary Project, to Jason Webber, Principal of Britannia Community Elementary School ("Britannia").  The school is located in the downtown east-side of Vancouver, BC, Canada with more than 50% of the student population being Indigenous Canadians.  The Rotary Club of Vancouver had funded the purchase of the Dictionaries so that each grade 3 student at Britannia would receive his or her own Dictionary. 
 
 
Here are Jason Webber, Principal of Britannia, and Phil Webber in the library/resource centre of Britannia with the boxes of books containing the gift from The Dictionary Project
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In addition, as a separate gift from The Dictionary Project, Phil delivered three boxes of books, containing 37 titles and 131 books in total which are all focused on fostering literacy or knowledge of the English language.  A list of those books is attached.  Mary French, the driving force behind The Dictionary Project, was particularly interested in ensuring that these books were received by Britannia, the second elementary school supported by Rotary Club of Vancouver as part of its literacy initiatives.  If for any reason, any of the books cannot be of use to Britannia, or find a home there or with any of the families which comprise the school population, then please consider sharing those with John Norquay Elementary School, with whom Rotary Club of Vancouver is also engaged in literacy projects, including with The Dictionary Project.     
 
You will note that Jason Webber is wearing an “Every Child Matters” orange shirt to pay tribute to the 215 Indigenous children whose bodies were found in a mass grave at a former Kamloops Indian residential school during the week leading up to May 29, 2021.  The significance of wearing orange shirts has been memorialized in  Orange Shirt Day, also known as the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, a Canadian statutory holiday.  Orange Shirt Day was created and designed to educate people and promote awareness in Canada about the Indian residential school system[2] and the impact it has had on Indigenous communities for over a century. It is held annually on September 30 in Canadian communities, where people are encouraged to wear an orange shirt. The September 30 annual date of the event, signifies the time of year when Indigenous children were historically taken from their homes to residential schools. The official tagline of the day, "Every Child Matters", reminds Canadians that all peoples' cultural experiences are important.  
The inspiration for Orange Shirt Day came from residential school survivor Phyllis Jack Webstad, who shared her story at a St. Joseph Mission (SJM) Residential School Commemoration Project and Reunion event held in Williams Lake, British Columbia, in the spring of 2013. Phyllis recounted her first day of residential schooling at six years old, when she was stripped of her clothes, including the new orange shirt her grandmother bought her, which was never returned. The orange shirt now symbolizes how the residential school system took away the indigenous identity of its students.
In addition to simply wearing an orange shirt, Canadians are encouraged to learn more about the history of residential schools and their assimilation practices, drawing from Phyllis' experience in particular. For instance, many communities have held memorial walks, film screenings, and public lectures to raise awareness about Indigenous history. Additionally, school boards across Canada have begun to use this event to teach children about the historic system.